Monday, March 19, 2018

Writing To-Do List

Sunset view in Florence, Italy, across the Arno

Most of us keep calendars marked with deadlines and upcoming activities. We know the value of writing something down to remember. My most important list, my Writing To-Do list, is the one that keeps my writing organized and helps me to be more efficient with my time.

I encourage all of my writing students and clients to create a Writing To-List which should accomplish three major tasks for you: 1. It will help you to see all of your projects in one place, including the ones you are working on, the ones that are taking a break and the ones that you hope to write soon. 2. The list will break down a large project into smaller pieces for you. 3. It will save you time by helping you to be able to accomplish small tasks quickly.

My Writing To-Do list begins with the big category Large Projects. Here I list my very big goals and projects (for example, I will name my current poetry manuscript, name a children's book project and remind myself to work on individual poems and essays. I will also list the projected title or a quick summary of something that I hope to write next.) This is like a very vague outline to remember what I'm working towards.

The next section, Individual Sections To Write Or Edit, will list the above larger projects followed by chapters, research, back stories, etc., that need to be written. For example, I might include something like:
Novel Y (Finish Thanksgiving scene, edit birthday chapter, research holiday music in 1950 and write backstory for Aunt E.)
This is the section that breaks the larger project into smaller pieces. If you find that you suddenly have one hour to do some work, you can look at your Writing To-Do list and choose something to write, research or edit. (This is different from each individual project's complete outline.)

The next two sections deal with pieces that are ready for submission: Individual Projects to Submit/Resubmit and a list of submission ideas organized by due dates: Submission, Grant or Residency Deadlines. This is another good place to look when you only have a small period of time to accomplish something related to your writing. (Another vital list to keep organized is your Submission Spreadsheet.)

The final section of my Writing To-Do list is less urgent or specific, but rather a loose gathering of places that I'm considering submitting my work to under the header of Submission Outlet Ideas. The places are organized by theme or type (for example, I have one section for creative non-fiction outlets and one for poetry.)

Every Writing To-Do list will look different, depending on where you are in your project(s) and what your goals are. Create the headers that make sense for you. You might also include Writing Prompts, Daily Goals, Reading Ideas or Research. 


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